Swahili Projects

Chapati Flava

By students taking African 332: Second Semester Swahili taught by Mwita Muniko (Spring 2019)

Kupika Chapati

By Max Bobholz taking African 331: First Semester Arabic taught by Rebecca Mandich (Fall 2018)

Greetings

By students taking African 331: First Semester Arabic taught by Rebecca Mandich (Fall 2018)

Ukimwi

By Maria Endries taking African 436: Advanced Studies in Swahili Language taught by Mwita Muniko (Spring 2018)

 

Black Panther

By students taking African 332: Second Semester Swahili taught by Safiya Jama (Spring 2018)

Harusi

By students taking African 332: Second Semester Swahili taught by Serah Kivuti (Spring 2015)

Sura Yako

A music video to accompany the song by Sauti Sol, created by students taking African 332: Second Semester Swahili taught by David Lukhachi (Spring 2015)

Hadithi za Kiswahili – Swahili Stories

Collected by Lowell Brower (B.A. in African Languages and Literature, 2004)

The Swahili stories posted here were collected in Chole Mjini, a small island in the Mafia Archipelago, twenty miles off of the east coast of Tanzania. In the fall of 2001, I, then a junior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was given the opportunity to conduct folkloric research in Tanzania. These stories, along with the many others which will be included in book which I hope to publish in the near future, are the result of a month-long story collecting expedition amongst the kindest, most generous people whom I have ever had the pleasure to meet—the WaChole.

Sura Yako

A music video to accompany the song by Sauti Sol, created by students taking African 332: Second Semester Swahili taught by David Lukhachi (Spring 2015)

Hadithi za Kiswahili – Swahili Stories

Collected by Lowell Brower (B.A. in African Languages and Literature, 2004)

The Swahili stories posted on this website were collected in Chole Mjini, a small island in the Mafia Archipelago, twenty miles off of the east coast of Tanzania. In the fall of 2001, I, then a junior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was given the opportunity to conduct folkloric research in Tanzania. These stories, along with the many others which will be included in book which I hope to publish in the near future, are the result of a month-long story collecting expedition amongst the kindest, most generous people whom I have ever had the pleasure to meet—the WaChole.