African Cultural Studies

College of Letters & Science
HomeSamuel England

Samuel England

Associate Professor 

Ph.D. (2011) Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley 

B.A. (1999) Near Eastern Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Office: 1404 Van Hise 

E-mail: samuel.england@wisc.edu

Samuel England is Associate Professor of Arabic. He teaches Classical and modern Arabic, Mediterranean cultures, and sub-Saharan African sources. Prof. England writes on Classical Arabic poetry and prose, courts in the Middle East and Europe, Crusades literature, Arab nationalist film and drama of the past century, and Romance-language treatments of Islam. He is the author of Medieval Empires and the Culture of Competition: Literary Duels at Islamic and Christian Courts (Edinburgh University Press, 2017).

Selected Courses Taught

African 201: Introduction to African Literature
African 231: Introduction to Arabic Literary Culture
African 300: Arab Publics
African 300: Arabic Fiction and Falsehood
African 300: Modern Arabic Literature and the Press 
African 605: Cultural Geographies of Africa and the Middle East 
African 901: Imagining Islam

 

Selected Publications

   Medieval Empires and the Culture of Competition

 

Journal Articles

“An Ayyubid Renaissance: Saladin, from Knighthood to Nahḍa.” Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics, 2018. Issue ed. Mona Baker

“‘Blame these Days, Don’t Blame Me!’ Rewriting Medieval Arabic in Maghrebi National Literature and Drama.” Journal of Arabic Literature, January 2015 

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/1570064x-12341293

“Morocco, Latin America, and the Problem of Reading.” Middle Eastern Literatures, August 2012 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1475262X.2012.695681

Chapters in Edited Volumns 

“Drama and Multiculturalism in Crisis: Ibn Dāniyāl’s Shadow Play” Volume in Honor of James T. Monroe. Ed. Michelle Hamilton and David Wacks. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2018  

“Sects, Lies, and Videotape.” Unwatchable. Ed. Nicholas Baer, Maggie Hennefeld, Laura Horak, and Gunnar Iversen. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2018